Amal Kassir

Spoken Word Poet

Amal has performed in 8 countries and over 25 cities, from youth prisons to orphanages to refugee camps. Her work in the community involves humanitarian initiatives for Syria, speaking out and organizing against Islamophobia, and empowering the voice of the marginalized through writing & speaking.

Biography

Amal Kassir is a Syrian-American international spoken word poet. She is a 2012 Brave New Voices International Slam Champion with Denver’s Minor Disturbance & has been featured in LA Times, PBS Newshour, Colorado Public Radio, Westword Magazine and the Denver Post. Based in Denver, CO, she attends university full-time & teaches workshops to communities across Denver, performing nationally & internationally throughout the semester while picking up a shift or two from the family’s Damascus Restaurant.

Amal has performed in 8 countries and over 50 cities, from youth prisons to orphanages to refugee camps. Her work in the community involves humanitarian initiatives for Syria, speaking out and organizing against Islamophobia, and empowering the voice of the marginalized through writing & speaking. She organizes demonstrations, vigils, fundraisers & other educational events in Colorado & has spoken on several CO News Outlets.

Amal does spoken word poetry, lectures and workshops around the themes of activism, social justice, and leadership. She is a master of crafting words to paint pictures. Listening to her speak,  you will be able to hear the beating of her grandmother’s heart, feel the pain of Syria’s orphans, and visualize the hope for a better world.

My Grandmother’s Farm: Spoken Word

Amal Kassir lived in Syria for many years. She says her time there helped her understand the people’s suffering while the freedoms she has in America allowed her to become an activist on their behalf. She performs slam poetry at festivals and political rallies around the U.S., like her past performance of “My Grandmother’s Farm” at the University of Colorado Denver.

And when we’re not asking someone their name, we’re not asking them their story. So when the courageously curious do pop the whats-your-name question, I try to make it worth their while.

The Muslim on the Airplane: TEDx Talk

Watching the news, it seems like ethnic divides are ever-deepening. But how can we solve these complicated problems when each side lives in fear of the other? The answer is simple, argues Syrian-American poet Amal Kassir – it starts with, “What’s your name?”

Amal’s TEDx Talk has been viewed over a million times.